Chennai, we are coming to you for next RISC-V workshop…

So glad and happy to let you know that we will be presenting in RISC-V workshop at IIT Madras, India, on July 19, 2018 at 2pm (organized by RISC-V foundation), and topic is something which we have mastered in last 7 years – its about a survey of E31 RISC-V core floorplan and its impact on power, performance and area.

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An overview of Design Automation Conference (DAC) 2018

That’s exactly what happened in DAC2018 at Moscone Center, San Francisco. I was invited for a talk in DAC summer school, on my work “vsdflow” which is also one of the main topics of discussion in my “TCL programming” course on Udemy. I would say, the entire DAC was a journey of events, exchange of ideas between brightest minds of the world.

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Symposium VI – Standard cell layout/characterization

Symposium VI – Standard cell layout/characterization, ECSM puts its number in the same arc as NLDM. The numbers you see in above image, below the cell_rise, cell_fall, rise_transition is all NLDM information. Under rise_transition, you will have ecsm_waveform and ecsm_capacitance. Now this is only one waveform, because we gave it only one load and one slope, just like we have one value under “rise_transition”. If we had 3×3 under rise_transition, then you would have had ecsm_waveform(“0”), ecsm_waveform(“1”), till ecsm_waveform(“8”), essentially 9 waveforms. And same thing with capacitance

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Wanna fix DRC notch violations? There you go…

DRC is something which (most likely) is supposed to fail in first instance. Let’s see what you do to fix them. In below eg. drc count is 25. Qrouter (an open-source router, which will be discussed in detail in webinar) is really good with some standard cell sets like the one which comes distributed with qflow, like OSU018, they are really nice one’s to work with. All the ports have nice squares, they don’t have these inside ‘L’ corners as shown below.

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Distributed timing analysis webinar

There are multiple places, we can introduce distributed computing to timing and major motivation is to speed up the timing closure. We have to analyze timing under different range of conditions, typically quantified as modes (test mode, functional mode) and corner (PVT). The number of combinations (timing views) you have to run is typically increasing exponentially with lower nodes. That’s where you need to need to distribute timing analysis across different machines.

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